LSI Blog

A couple of years ago I got a DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) camera.  After using a compact digital camera, the DSLR opened a new world of photography for me. It was great to have the option to shoot six frames per second, use different lenses and fine-tune shutter speed, exposure and other parameters.

Learning to take my photography to a higher level, from auto to manual settings, was quite an experience.  Through research and talking to friends and photographers, I discovered that I needed to learn these fundamentals:

  • Shutter Speed (time the sensor is exposed to light)
  • Aperture (how much light the lens will allow in)
  • ISO (sensor sensitivity to light)

Experimenting with each of these variables was a frustrating test of Murphy’s Law.

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I started working years ago to engage large datacenters, learn what their problems are and try to craft solutions for their problems. It’s taken years, but we engaged them, learned, changed how we thought about storage and began creating solutions that are being deployed at scale.

We’ve started to do the same with the Chinese Internet giants. They’re growing at an incredible rate.  They have similar problems, but it’s surprising how different their solution approaches are. Each one is unique. And we’re constantly learning from these guys.

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When implementing an LSI Nytro WarpDrive (NWD) or Nytro MegaRAID (NMR) PCIe card in a Linux server, you’ll need to modify quite a few variables to produce the best performance.

In the Linux server, device assignments sometimes change after reboots. Sometimes, the PCIe card can be assigned /dev/sda. Other times, it can be assigned /dev/sdd, or any device name. This variability can wreak havoc when modifying the Linux environment variables. To get around this issue, assignments by the SCSI address should be used so all of the Linux performance variables will be persisted properly across reboots.

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My “Size matters: Everything you need to know about SSD form factors” blog in January spawned some interesting questions, a number of them on Z-height.

What is a Z-height anyway?
For a solid state drive (SSD), Z-height describes its thickness and is generally its smallest dimension. Z-height is a redundant term, since Z is a variable representing the height of an SSD. The “Z” is one of the variables – X, Y and Z, synonymous with length, width and height – that describe the measurements of a 3-dimensional object.

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Big data, it’s the buzz word of the year and it’s generating a lot of attention. An incalculable number of articles fervently repeat the words “variety, velocity and volume,” citing click streams, RFID tags, email, surveillance cameras, Twitter® feeds, Facebook® posts, Flickr® images, blog musings, YouTube® videos, cellular texting, healthcare monitoring …. (gasps for air). We have become a society that sweats buckets of data every day (the latest estimates are approximately 34GB per person every 24 hours) and businesses are scrambling to capture all this information to learn more about us.

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Software-defined datacenters (SDDC) and software-defined storage (SDS) are big movements in the industry right now. Just read the trade press or attend any conference and you’ll see that – it’s a big deal. We’re seeing for-pay vendors providing solutions, as well as strong ecosystems evolving around open source solutions. It’s not surprising why – there is a need for enterprises to deploy large scale compute clusters, and that takes either deep expertise that’s very rare, or orchestration tools that have not existed in the past.

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During the past few years, the deployment of cloud architectures has accelerated to support various consumer and enterprise applications such as email, word processing, enterprise resource planning, customer relationship management and the like. Traditionally, co-located servers, storage and networking moved to the cloud en masse in the form of a service, with overlying applications that have been and remain very insensitive to delay and jitter.

But the fast-emerging next generation of business applications require much tighter service level agreements (SLA) from cloud providers.

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The introduction of LSI® SF3700 flash controllers has prompted many questions about the PCIe® (PCI Express) interface and how it benefits solid state storage, and there’s no better person to turn to for insights than our resident expert, Jeremy Werner, Sr. Director of Product and Customer Management in LSI’s Flash Components Division (SandForce):

Most client-based SSDs have used SATA in the past, while PCIe was mainly used for enterprise applications. Why is the PCIe interface becoming so popular for the client market?

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What is Oracle ASM?
The Oracle® automatic storage management system (ASM) was developed 10 years ago to make it much easier for database administrators (DBAs) to use and tune database storage. Oracle ASM enables DBAs to:

  • Automatically stripe data over each RAW device to improve database storage performance
  • Mirror data for greater fault tolerance
  • Simplify the management and extension of database storage for the cloud and, with the ASM Cluster File System (ACFS), use the snapshot and replication functionality to increase availability
  • Add the Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC) capability to help reduce total cost of ownership (TCO), expand scalability and increase availability, among other benefits
  • Easily move data from one device to another while the database is active with no performance degradation
  • Reduce or eliminate storage or Linux administrator time for configuring database storage
  • Use ASM as a Linux®/Unix operating system file system called ACFS.
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How did he do that?
Growing up, I watched a little TV.  Okay, a lot of TV as I did not have my DVR or iPad and a man who would one day occupy the White House as VP had not yet invented the Internet.  Of the many shows I watched, MacGyver was one of my favorites. He would take ordinary objects and use them to solve complicated problems in a way no one could have imagined. Out of all the things he used, his trusty Swiss army knife was the most awesome. 

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