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You may have noticed I’m interested in Open Compute. What you may not know is I’m also really interested in OpenStack. You’re either wondering what the heck I’m talking about or nodding your head. I think these two movements are co-dependent. Sure they can and will exist independently, but I think the success of each is tied to the other.  In other words, I think they are two sides of the same coin.

Why is this on my mind? Well – I’m the lucky guy who gets to moderate a panel at LSI’s AIS conference, with the COO of Open Compute, and the founder of OpenStack. More on that later. First, I guess I should describe my view of the two. The people running these open-source efforts probably have a different view. We’ll find that out during the panel.

I view Open Compute as the very first viable open-source hardware initiative that general business will be able to use. It’s not just about saving money for rack-scale deployments. It’s about having interoperable, multi-source systems that have known, customer-malleable – even completely customized and unique – characteristics including management.  It also promises to reduce OpEx costs.

Ready for Prime Time?
But the truth is Open Compute is not ready for prime time yet. Facebook developed almost all the designs for its own use and gifted them to Open Compute, and they are mostly one or two generations old. And somewhere between 2,000 and 10,000 Open Compute servers have shipped. That’s all. But, it’s a start.

More importantly though, it’s still just hardware. There is still a need to deploy and manage the hardware, as well as distribute tasks, and load balance a cluster of Open Compute infrastructure. That’s a very specialized capability, and there really aren’t that many people who can do that. And the hardware is so bare bones – with specialized enclosures, cooling, etc – that it’s pretty hard to deploy small amounts. You really want to deploy at scale – thousands. If you’re deploying a few servers, Open Compute probably isn’t for you for quite some time.

I view OpenStack in a similar way. It’s also not ready for prime time. OpenStack is an orchestration layer for the datacenter. You hear about the “software defined datacenter.” Well, this is it – at least one version. It pools the resources (compute, object and block storage, network, and memory at some time in the future), presents them, allows them to be managed in a semi-automatic way, and automates deployment of tasks on the scaled infrastructure. Sure there are some large-scale deployments. But it’s still pretty tough to deploy at large scale. That’s because it needs to be tuned and tailored to specific hardware. In fact, the biggest datacenters in the world mostly use their own orchestration layer.  So that means today OpenStack is really better at smaller deployments, like 50, 100 or 200 server nodes.

The synergy – 2 sides of the same coin
You’ll probably start to see the synergy. Open Compute needs management and deployment. OpenStack prefers known homogenous hardware or else it’s not so easy to deploy. So there is a natural synergy between the two. It’s interesting too that some individuals are working on both… Ultimately, the two Open initiatives will meet in the big, but not-too-big (many hundreds to small thousands of servers) deployments in the next few years.

Ecosystem
And then of course there is the complexity of the interaction of for-profit companies and open-source designs and distributions. Companies are trying to add to the open standards. Sometimes to the betterment of standards, but sometimes in irrelevant ways. Several OEMs are jumping in to mature and support OpenStack. And many ODMs are working to make Open Compute more mature. And some companies are trying to accelerate the maturity and adoption of the technologies in pre-configured solutions or appliances. What’s even more interesting are the large customers – guys like Wall Street banks – that are working to make them both useful for deployment at scale. These won’t be the only way scaled systems are deployed, but they’re going to become very common platforms for scale-out or grid infrastructure for utility computing.

Here is how I charted the ecosystem last spring. There’s not a lot of direct interaction between the two, and I know there are a lot of players missing. Frankly, it’s getting crazy complex. There has been an explosion of players, and I’ve run out of space, so I’ve just not gotten around to updating it. (If anyone engaged in these ecosystems wants to update it and send me a copy – I’d be much obliged! Maybe you guys at Nebula ? ;-)).

An AIS keynote panel – What?
Which brings me back to that keynote panel at AIS. Every year LSI has a conference that’s by invitation only (sorry). It’s become a pretty big deal. We have some very high-profile keynotes from industry leaders. There is a fantastic tech showcase of LSI products, partner and ecosystem company’s products, and a good mix of proof of concepts, prototypes and what-if products. And there are a lot of breakout sessions on industry topics, trends and solutions. Last year I personally escorted an IBM fellow, Google VPs, Facebook architects, bank VPs, Amazon execs, flash company execs, several CTOs, some industry analysts, database and transactional company execs…

It’s a great place to meet and interact with peers if you’re involved in the datacenter, network or cellular infrastructure businesses.  One of the keynotes is actually a panel of 2. The COO of Open Compute, Cole Crawford, and the co-founder of OpenStack, Chris Kemp (who is also the founder and CSO of Nebula). Both of them are very smart, experienced and articulate, and deeply involved in these movements. It should be a really engaging, interesting keynote panel, and I’m lucky enough to have a front-row seat. I’ll be the moderator, and I’m already working on questions. If there is something specific you would like asked, let me know, and I’ll try to accommodate you.

You can see more here.

Yea – I’m very interested in Open Compute and OpenStack. I think these two movements are co-dependent. And I think they are already changing our industry – even before they are ready for real large-scale deployment.  Sure they can and will exist independently, but I think the success of each is tied to the other. The people running these open-source efforts might have a different view. Luckily, we’ll get to find out what they think next month… And I’m lucky enough to have a front row seat.

 

Rob Ober drives LSI into new technologies, businesses and products as an LSI fellow in Corporate Strategy. Prior to joining LSI, he was a fellow in the... Read more

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