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LSI Blog

I was asked some interesting questions recently by CEO & CIO, a Chinese business magazine. The questions ranged from how Chinese Internet giants like Alibaba, Baidu and Tencent differ from other customers and what leading technologies big Internet companies have created to questions about emerging technologies such as software-defined storage (SDS) and software-defined datacenters (SDDC) and changes in the ecosystem of datacenter hardware, software and service providers. These were great questions. Sometimes you need the press or someone outside the industry to ask a question that makes you step back and think about what’s going on.

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Turn on your smart phone and it works like charm. But explosive global adoption of smart phones with feature-rich applications is stressing mobile networks like never before. For mobile network providers, the challenge couldn’t be more acute: Find new ways to deliver more mobile bandwidth even as the average revenue per user remains flat.

In this AIS interview, LSI’s Jeff Connell, director of mobile networking product marketing, talks about how network providers are turning to heterogenous networks (HetNets) to reduce the cost of deploying, scaling and managing mobile networks.

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Hadoop has grown from an identity-challenged adolescent, a budding technology unsure of which use cases to call its own, to a fairly mature young adult with its most recent release of Hadoop® 2.0. Apache™ Hadoop® was introduced in 2007 with the primary intent to provide MapReduce-based batch processing for big data. While the original Hadoop certainly has made a big impact on how we use big data, it also had its limitations, chief among them:

  1. Batch processing compute resources were allocated strictly on a (static) slot basis.
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It’s the start of the new year, and it’s traditional to make predictions – right? But predicting the future of the datacenter has been hard lately. There have been and continue to be so many changes in flight that possibilities spin off in different directions. Fractured visions through a kaleidoscope. Changes are happening in the businesses behind datacenters, the scale, the tasks and what is possible to accomplish, the value being monetized, and the architectures and technologies to enable all of these.

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Deploying a mix of datacenter resources in a preconfigured server – compute, storage, network, and memory – in a way that they are fixed, can’t be tuned to a use case, and must be replaced entirely for an upgrade is how the IT industry has been working for years. Each server is an island.

This is an inefficient path when you deploy more than a few servers. That’s why there is an architectural movement in hyperscale datacenters (and it’s sure to be emulated by enterprise in a few years) to “disaggregate” – or, the term I prefer, “pool” – these resources.

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Open Compute and OpenStack are changing the datacenter world that we know and love. I thought they were having impact. Changing our OEMs and ODM products, changing what we expect from our vendors, changing the interoperability of managing infrastructure from different vendors. Changing our ability to deploy and manage grid and scale-out infrastructure. And changing how quickly and at what high level we can be innovating. I was wrong. It’s happening much more quickly than I thought.

On November 20-21 we hosted LSI AIS 2013.

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Last week at LSI’s annual Accelerating Innovation Summit (AIS) the company took the wraps off a vision that should lead its technical direction for the next few years.

The LSI keynote featured a video of three situations as they might evolve in the future:

  • A man falls from a bicycle in a foreign country and needs medical attention
  • A bullet train stops before hitting a tree that fell across its tracks
  • A hacker is prevented from accessing secure information using identity theft

I’ll focus on just one of these to show how LSI expects the future to develop. 

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The problem with multicore processors isn’t that they have a lot of cores. I hope my IC designer colleagues don’t jump me when I say that having more than one core on a chip is a simple matter of cut and paste. The tricky part is getting all those cores to work together – a coordinated, efficient effort is key. After all, if it were enough for the cores to work independently, we would just use multiple single-core processors. To be sure, the devil is in the details of connecting cores and managing how they share resources.

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Pushing your enterprise cluster solution to deliver the highest performance at the lowest cost is key in architecting scale-out datacenters. Administrators must expand their storage to keep pace with their compute power as capacity and processing demands grow.

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The lifeblood of any online retailer is the speed of its IT infrastructure. Shoppers aren’t infinitely patient. Sluggish infrastructure performance can make shoppers wait precious seconds longer than they can stand, sending them fleeing to other sites for a faster purchase. Our federal government’s halting rollout of the Health Insurance Marketplace website is a glaring example of what can happen when IT infrastructure isn’t solid. A few bad user experiences that go viral can be damaging enough. Tens of thousands can be crippling.  

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