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The world according to DAS

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You might be surprised to find out how big the infrastructure for cloud and Web 2.0 is. It is mind-blowing. Microsoft has acknowledged packing more than 1 million servers into its datacenters, and by some accounts that is fewer than Google’s massive server count but a bit more than Amazon.  

Facebook’s server count is said to have skyrocketed from 30,000 in 2012 to 180,000 just this past August, serving 900 million plus users. And the social media giant is even putting its considerable weight behind the Open Compute effort to make servers fit better in a rack and draw less power. The list of mega infrastructures also includes Tencent, Baidu and Alibaba and the roster goes on and on.

Even more jaw-dropping is that almost 99.9% of these hyperscale infrastructures are built with servers featuring direct-attached storage. That’s right – they do the computing and store the data. In other words, no special, dedicated storage gear. Yes, your Facebook photos, your Skydrive personal cloud and all the content you use for entertainment, on-demand video and gaming data are stored inside the server.

Direct-attached storage reigns supreme
Everything in these infrastructures – compute and storage – is built out of x-86 based servers with storage inside. What’s more, growth of direct-attached storage is many folds bigger than any other storage deployments in IT. Rising deployments of cloud, or cloud-like, architectures are behind much of this expansion.

The prevalence of direct-attached storage is not unique to hyperscale deployments. Large IT organizations are looking to reap the rewards of creating similar on-premise infrastructures. The benefits are impressive: Build one kind of infrastructure (server racks), host anything you want (any of your properties), and scale if you need to very easily. TCO is much less than infrastructures relying on network storage or SANs.

With direct-attached you no longer need dedicated appliances for your database tier, your email tier, your analytics tier, your EDA tier. All of that can be hosted on scalable, share-nothing infrastructure. And just as with hyperscale, the storage is all in the server. No SAN storage required.

Open Compute, OpenStack and software-defined storage drive DAS growth
Open Compute is part of the picture. A recent Open Compute show I attended was mostly sponsored by hyperscale customers/suppliers. Many big-bank IT folks attended. Open Compute isn’t the only initiative driving growing deployments of direct-attached storage. So is software-defined storage and OpenStack. Big application vendors such as Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and SAP are also on board, providing solutions that support server-based storage/compute platforms that are easy and cost-effective to deploy, maintain and scale and need no external storage (or SAN including all-flash arrays).

So if you are a network-storage or SAN manufacturer, you have to be doing some serious thinking (many have already) about how you’re going to catch and ride this huge wave of growth.

 

 

 

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