Back in the 1990s, a new paradigm was forced into space exploration. NASA faced big cost cuts. But grand ambitions for missions to Mars were still on its mind. The problem was it couldn’t dream and spend big. So the NASA mantra became “faster, better, cheaper.” The idea was that the agency could slash costs while still carrying out a wide variety of programs and space missions. This led to some radical rethinks, and some fantastically successful programs that had very outside-the-box solutions. (Bouncing Mars landers anyone?)

That probably sounds familiar to any IT admin. And that spirit is alive at LSI’s AIS – The Accelerating Innovation Summit, which is our annual congress of customers and industry pros, coming up Nov. 20-21 in San Jose. Like the people at Mission Control, they all want to make big things happen… without spending too much.

Take technology and line of business professionals. They need to speed up critical business applications. A lot. Or IT staff for enterprise and mobile networks, who must deliver more work to support the ever-growing number of users, devices and virtualized machines that depend on them. Or consider mega datacenter and cloud service providers, whose customers demand the highest levels of service, yet get that service for free. Or datacenter architects and managers, who need servers, storage and networks to run at ever-greater efficiency even as they grow capability exponentially.

(LSI has been working on many solutions to these problems, some of which I spoke about in this blog.)

It’s all about moving data faster, better, and cheaper. If NASA could do it, we can too. In that vein, here’s a look at some of the topics you can expect AIS to address around doing more work for fewer dollars:

  • Emerging solid state technologies – Flash is dramatically enhancing datacenter efficiency and enabling new use cases. Could emerging solid state technologies such as Phase Change Memory (PCM) and Spin-Torque Transfer (STT) RAM radically change the way we use storage and memory?
  • Hyperscale deployments – Traditional SAN and NAS lack the scalability and economics needed for today’s hyperscale deployments. As businesses begin to emulate hyperscale deployments, they need to scale and manage datacenter infrastructure more effectively. Will software increasingly be used to both manage storage and provide storage services on commodity hardware?
  • Sub-20nm flash – The emergence of sub-20nm flash promises new cost savings for the storage industry. But with reduced data reliability, slower overall access times and much lower intrinsic endurance, is it ready for the datacenter?
  • Triple-Level Cell flash – The move to Multi-Level Cell (MLC) flash helped double the capacity per square millimeter of silicon, and Triple-Level Cell (TLC) promises even higher storage density. But TCL comes at a cost: its working life is much shorter than MLC. So what, if any role will TLC play in the datacenter? Remember – it wasn’t long ago no one believed MLC could be used in enterprise.
  • Flash for virtual desktop – Virtual desktop technology has seen significant growth in today’s datacenters. However, storage demands on highly utilized VDI servers can cause unacceptable response times. Can flash help virtual desktop environments achieve the best overall performance to improve end-user productivity while lowering total solution cost?
  • Flash caching – Oracle and storage vendors have started enhancing their products to take advantage of flash caching. How can database administrators implement caching technology running on Oracle® Linux with Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel, utilizing Oracle Database Smart Flash Cache?
  • Software Defined Networks (SDN) – SDNs promise to make networks more flexible, easier to manage, and programmable. How and why are businesses using SDNs today?  
  • Big data analytics – Gathering, interpreting and correlating multiple data streams as they are created can enhance real-time decision making for industries like financial trading, national security, consumer marketing, and network security. How can specialized silicon greatly reduce the compute power necessary, and make the “real-time” part of real-time analytics possible?
  • Sharable DAS – Datacenters of all sizes are struggling to provide high performance and 24/7 uptime, while reducing TCO. How can DAS-based storage sharing and scaling help meet the growing need for reduced cost and greater ease of use, performance, agility and uptime?
  • 12Gb/s SAS – Applications such as Web 2.0/cloud infrastructure, transaction processing and business intelligence are driving the need for higher-performance storage. How can 12Gb/s SAS meet today’s high-performance challenges for IOPS and bandwidth while providing enterprise-class features, technology maturity and investment protection, even with existing storage devices?

And, I think you’ll find some astounding products, demos, proof of concepts and future solutions in the showcase too – not just from LSI but from partners and fellow travelers in this industry. Hey – that’s my favorite part. I can’t wait to see people’s reactions.

Since they rethought how to do business in 2002, NASA has embarked on nearly 60 Mars missions. Faster, better, cheaper. It can work here in IT too.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Views: (788)