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Last week at LSI’s annual Accelerating Innovation Summit (AIS) the company took the wraps off a vision that should lead its technical direction for the next few years.

The LSI keynote featured a video of three situations as they might evolve in the future:

  • A man falls from a bicycle in a foreign country and needs medical attention
  • A bullet train stops before hitting a tree that fell across its tracks
  • A hacker is prevented from accessing secure information using identity theft

I’ll focus on just one of these to show how LSI expects the future to develop.  In the bicycle accident scenario, a businessman falls to the ground while riding a bicycle in a foreign country.  Security cameras that have been upgraded to understand what they see notify an emergency services agency which sends an ambulance to the scene.  The paramedic performs a retinal scan on the victim, using it to retrieve his medical records, including his DNA sequence, from the web.

The businessman’s wearable body monitoring system also communicates with the paramedic’s instruments to share his vital signs.  All of this information is used by cloud-based computers to determine a course of action which, in the video, requires an injection that has been custom-tuned to the victim’s current situation, his medical history, and his genetic makeup.

That’s a pretty tall order, and it will require several advances in the state of the art, but LSI is using this and other scenarios to work with its clients and translate this vision into the products of the future.

What are the key requirements to make this happen? Talwalkar told the audience that we need to create a society that is supported by preventive, predictive and assisted analytics to move in a direction where the general welfare is assisted by all that the Internet and advanced computing have to offer.  Since data is growing at an exponential rate, he argued that this will require the instant retrieval of interlinked data objects at scale. Everything that is key to solving the task must be immediately available, and must be quickly analyzed to provide a solution to the problem at hand. The key will be the ability to process interlinked pieces of data that have not been previously structured to handle any particular situation.

To achieve this we will need larger-scale computing resources than are currently available, all closely interconnected, that all operate at very high speeds.  LSI hopes to tap into these needs through its strengths in networking and communications chips for the communications, its HDD and server and storage connectivity array chips and boards for large-scale data, and its flash controller memory and PCIe SSD expertise for high performance.

LSI brought to AIS several of the customers and partners it is working with using to develop these technologies. Speakers from Intel, Microsoft, IBM, Toshiba, Ericsson and others showed how they are working with LSI’s various technologies to improve the performance of their own systems.  On the exhibition floor booths from LSI and many of its clients demonstrated new technologies that performed everything from high-speed stock market analysis to fast flash management.

It’s pretty exciting to see a company that has a clear vision of its future and is committed to moving its entire ecosystem ahead to make that happen and help companies manage their business more effectively during what LSI calls the “Datacentric Era.” LSI has certainly put a lot of effort into creating a vision and determining where its talents can be brought to bear to improve our lives in the future.

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