All NAND flash-based SSDs use a process called garbage collection (GC) so the flash memory can be rewritten with fresh data, enabling the SSD to function like any other rewritable storage device. The number of rewrites (program/erase cycles) possible with NAND flash memory is finite. That’s why it’s essential to ensure that each P/E cycle really counts – that is, each is performed with top efficiency – to help preserve optimum SSD performance.

Collecting the garbage takes time
In my 2011 Flash Memory Summit presentation , I went into great detail about how GC – the automatic memory management process of clearing invalid data from memory to give new data a clean slate – works in an SSD. Here’s a recap: flash memory is organized in groups of pages where data can be written. Once a page is written, it cannot be rewritten until it is erased. Simple enough. But a page can only be erased within a group of typically 128 pages called a block. But wait. The complexity of writing data really starts to escalate in the case of random writes replacing previously written data. Random writes put the new data in previously erased pages elsewhere, peppering a block of valid data with “patches of invalid data.” In order to write new data to these patches, the whole block – all 128 pages – must be erased. But first all surrounding pages with valid data must be read and then rewritten to blank pages. The newly erased block of blank pages is then ready to save new data.

So why’s this a problem? This rewriting process shares the same path to the flash memory as new data arriving from the host system. You see the issue – a bottleneck. What you may not know is that this traffic jam can severely degrade overall write performance, sometimes as much as 90%.

Why not collect the garbage when the SSD is idle?
To improve write performance, many SSDs perform idle-time GC or background GC. When the SSD is idle – not performing reads or writes from the host system – the data paths to the flash memory are open. In a perfect world, the SSD controller would move all valid data into a contiguous group of new blocks so that all the free space would be consolidated into a few very large areas. Then, when new data arrived, the controller would send it directly to the fresh blocks and be spared from having to move data around just to free up space on pages of invalid data. But the world is far from perfect.

No free lunch, even from the garbage can
As might be expected, background or idle-time GC has drawbacks. The two main downsides are:

1.      For users of Ultrabooks and other mobile systems, battery power is precious. The longer users can work unplugged between battery charges, the better. To make the most of a single charge, these systems use features like DevSleep to drastically reduce power to internal components not in use. At times when no data is being stored to or retrieved from the SSD, the host system gears down the SSD into a low power state (like DevSleep) to reduce power draw. In this state, an SSD with background or idle-time GC has no power to perform GC.

The upshot is that the SSD will be very slow when the system turns it back on and starts sending new data that must be saved in the spaces not yet cleared out by garbage-collected while the SSD was asleep. Alternately, the SSD may temporarily override the low power command from the host in order to perform the background GC, pulling more power from the battery and shortening the time remaining before it needs to be recharged.

2.      When the SSD is performing GC, invalid data is ignored and only valid data is moved before the block is erased. Now imagine a large 2GB file on the SSD that the user plans to delete tomorrow. The SSD has no clue this will happen, so it automatically performs background GC around the 2GB file – and all other data – today, consuming one more of the very limited, precious program/erase cycles for all the flash holding that data. Ideally, the SSD would have waited one more day to garbage collect, the user would have already deleted the file, and the SSD wouldn’t have had to move all that data to new locations. No unnecessary data movement. No unnecessary use of a precious program/erase cycle.

Many people don’t realize that the number of background reads and writes initiated by the operating system, virus checkers, browsers, etc., far outstrip the number initiated by the computer user. Some users rarely delete files, believing they’ll extend the life of their SSD. The truth is, user file deletions are a drop in the bucket. It’s not their use of the computer storage that causes the most wear and tear. Background action from applications and the operating system is the real culprit.

Is there a better option?
What’s an SSD user to do? A super-fast foreground GC engine is the best solution. The key is special hardware and firmware integrated into the flash controller that streamlines garbage collection so it can run in the foreground with incoming data. The engine also enables high-speed writes to the flash memory. By maintaining high write speeds for GC operations, the SSD can afford to leave all valid data mixed with invalid data. That way the blocks are not recycled until absolutely necessary, dramatically reducing wear. Plus, the longer the SSD waits to GC pages, the higher the likelihood other pages of data will have already been made invalid by the operating system or user. The result is lower write amplification, longer flash endurance, and even higher performance.

All LSI® SandForce® Flash Controllers employ foreground GC to provide these invaluable benefits to the user.

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Most consumers are skeptical when they see a manufacturer whipping out grandiose performance claims. And for good reason. The manufacturer could be stretching the truth, twisting the results, or just being downright misleading. From this distrust grew demand for 3rd-party writers to review products, test claims and provide an unbiased analysis of the device’s performance and other capabilities – as consumers would experience themselves.

Who can really claim to be an SSD benchmarking expert?
Solid state drive (SSD) technology is still relatively new in the computer industry, and in many ways SSDs are profoundly different from hard disk drives – perhaps most notably, in the way they record data, to a NAND cell rather than on spinning media. Because of differences in their operation, SSDs have to be tested in ways that are not necessarily obvious.

Can anyone who simply runs a benchmark application claim to be an expert? I would say not. Just as anyone sitting behind the wheel of a car is not necessarily an expert driver. The problem is that it is hard to determine the thoroughness and expertise of an SSD reviewer. Does the author really understand the details behind the technology to run adequate tests and analyze the results?

Can “experts” present bad data?
Maybe it is obvious, but of course experts can be wrong, especially when they are self-proclaimed mavens without deep experience in the technology they cover. At a minimum, you can generally count on them to act in good faith – that is, to not be intentionally misleading – but they can easily be misinformed (for instance, by manufacturers) and perpetuate the misinformation. What’s more, some reviewers are pressured to do a cursory analysis of an SSD as they crank through countless product evaluations under unremitting deadlines – a crush that can cause oversights in telling aspects of a drive’s performance. In any case, it is not good to rely on bad data no matter the intention.

What makes for a thorough SSD review?
Some reviewers have gone to great lengths to ensure their SSD analysis is extremely detailed and represents a real-world environment and performance. These reviewers will generally talk about how their analysis simulates a true user or server environment. The trouble can begin if a reviewer doesn’t recognize normal operation of an SSD in its own environment. With SSDs, “normal” is when garbage collection is operating, which greatly impacts overall performance. It’s important for reviewers to recognize that, with a new SSD, garbage collection is inactive until at least one full physical capacity of data has been sequentially written to the device. For example, with a 256GB SSD, 256GB of data must be written to trigger garbage collecting. At that point, garbage collection is ongoing, the drive has reached its steady-state performance, and the device is ready for evaluation. Random writes are another story, requiring up to three passes (full-capacity writes) randomly written to the SSD before the steady-state performance level shown below is reached.

You can see that running only a few minutes of random write tests on this SSD logs performance of over 275 MB/s. However, once garbage collection starts, performance plunges and then takes up to 3 hours before the true performance of 25 MB/s (a 90% drop) is finally evident – a phenomenon that often is not communicated clearly in reviews nor widely understood.

Good benchmarkers will discuss how their review factors in both garbage collection preparation and steady-state performance testing. Test results that purportedly achieve steady state in less time than in the example above are unlikely to reflect real-world performance. This is all part of what is called SSD preconditioning, but keep in mind that different tests require different steps for preconditioning.

For additional information on this topic, you can review my presentation from Flash Memory Summit 2013 on “Don’t let your favorite benchmarks lie to you.”

 

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In today’s solid state drives (SSDs), the NAND flash memory must be erased before it can store new data. In other words, data cannot be overwritten directly as it is in a hard disk drive (HDD). Instead, SSDs use a process called garbage collection (GC) to reclaim the space taken by previously stored data. This means that write demands are heavier on SSDs than HDDs when storing the same information.

This is bad because the flash memory in the SSD supports only a limited number of writes before it can no longer be read. We call this undesirable effect write amplification (WA). In my blog, Gassing up your SSD, I describe why WA exists in a little more detail, but here I will explain what controls it.

It’s all about the free space
I often tell people that SSDs work better with more free space, so anything that increases free space will keep WA lower. The two key ways to expand free space (thereby decreasing WA) are to 1) increase over provisioning and 2) keep more storage space free (if you have TRIM support).

As I said earlier, there is no WA before GC is active. However, this pristine pre-GC condition has a tiny life span – just one full-capacity write cycle during a “fresh-out-of-box” (FOB) state, which accounts for less than 0.04% of the SSD’s life. Although you can manually recreate this condition with a secure erase, the cost is an additional write cycle, which defeats the purpose. Also keep in mind that the GC efficiency and associated wear leveling algorithms can affect WA (more efficient = lower WA).

The other major contributor to WA is the organization of the free space (how data is written to the flash). When data is written randomly, the eventual replacement data will also likely come in randomly, so some pages of a block will be replaced (made invalid) and others will still be good (valid). During GC, valid data in blocks like this needs to be rewritten to new blocks. This produces another write to the flash for each valid page, causing write amplification.

With sequential writes, generally all the data in the pages of the block becomes invalid at the same time. As a result, no data needs relocating during GC since there is no valid data remaining in the block before it is erased. In this case, there is no amplification, but other things like wear leveling on blocks that don’t change will still eventually produce some write amplification no matter how data is written.

Calculating write amplification
Write Amplification is fundamentally the result of data written to the flash memory divided by data written by the host. In 2008, both Intel and SiliconSystems (acquired by Western Digital) were the first to start talking publically about WA. At that time, the WA of all SSDs was something greater than 1.0. It was not until SandForce introduced the first SSD controller with DuraWrite™ technology in 2009 that WA could fall below 1.0. DuraWrite technology increases the free space mentioned above, but in a way that is unique from other SSD controllers. In part two of my write amplification series, I will explain how DuraWrite technology works.

This three-part series examines some of the details behind write amplification, a key property of all NAND flash-based SSDs that is often misunderstood in the industry.

Part 2: When does an amplifier make things smaller?

Part 3: Hot to measure what can’t be seen

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It is always good to hear the opinions of your customers and end users, and in that respect June was a banner month for LSI® SandForce® flash controllers.

In a survey soliciting responses from more than 1 million members of on-line groups and other sources by IT Brand Pulse, an independent product testing and validation lab, LSI SandForce controllers ranked at the top of all six SSD controller chip sub-categories: market, price, performance, reliability, service and support, and innovation. Last August, the LSI SandForce controllers won in three of the six sub-categories, so we’re thrilled to see momentum building.

Winning all six awards is no easy task. Some of the sub-categories could be considered mutually exclusive, requiring customers to make trade-offs among product attributes. For example, often a product with the best price is considered to have skimped on quality compared to pricier solutions. A product with screaming performance, ironically, is seen as something of a market laggard because it usually does not carry the best price. So it is exciting to strike the right balance among all six measures and sweep the product category. You can find more details on the awards here: http://itbrandpulse.com/research/brand-leader-program/225-ssd-controller-chips-2013

For those of us in product marketing, winning product awards voted on by your peers can bring on a  feeling similar to that warm afterglow parents bask in when they hear their child has made the honor roll or was named the valedictorian for his or her graduating class.

So please pardon us, for a moment, as we beam with pride.

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It seems like our smartphones are getting bigger and bigger with each generation. Sometimes I see people holding what appears to be a tablet computer up next to their head. I doubt they know how ridiculous they look to the rest of us, and I wonder what pants today have pockets that big.

I certainly do like the convenience of the instant-on capabilities my smart phone gives me, but I still need my portable computer with its big screen and keyboard separate from my phone.

A few years ago, SATA-IO, the standards body, added a new feature to the Serial ATA (SATA) specification designed to further reduce battery consumption in portable computer products. This new feature, DevSleep, enables solid state drives (SSDs) to act more like smartphones, allowing you to go days without plugging in to recharge and then instantly turn them on and see all the latest email, social media updates, news and events.

Why not just switch the system off?
When most PC users think about switching off their system, they dread waiting for the operating system to boot back up. That is one of the key advantages of replacing the hard disk drive (HDD) in the system with a faster SSD. However, in our instant gratification society, we hate to wait even seconds for web pages to come up, so waiting minutes for your PC to turn on and boot up can feel like an eternity. Therefore, many people choose to leave the system on to save those precious moments… but at the expense of battery life.

Can I get this today?
To further extend battery life, the new DevSleep feature requires a signal change on the SATA connector. This change is currently supported only in new Intel® Haswell chipset-based platforms announced this June. What’s more, the SSD in these systems must support the DevSleep feature and monitor the signal on the SATA connector. Most systems that support DevSleep will likely be very low-power notebook systems and will likely already ship with an SSD installed using a small mSATA, M.2, or similar edge connector. Therefore, the signal change on the SATA interface will not immediately affect the rest of the SSDs designed for desktop systems shipping through retail and online sources. Note that not all SSDs are created equal and, while many claim support for DevSleep, be sure to look at the fine print to compare the actual power draw when in DevSleep.

At Computex last month, LSI announced support for the DevSleep feature and staged demonstrations showing a 400x reduction in idle power. It should be noted that a 400x reduction in power does not directly translate to a 400x increase in battery life, but any reduction in power will give you more time on the battery, and that will certainly benefit any user who often works without a power cord.

 

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Not likely. But you might think that solving your computer data security problems is very well possible when someone tells you that TCG Opal is the key. According to its website, “The Trusted Computing Group (TCG) is a not-for-profit organization formed to develop, define and promote open, vendor-neutral, global industry standards, supportive of a hardware-based root of trust, for interoperable trusted computing platforms.”

That might take a bit to digest, but think about TCG as a group of companies creating standards to simplify deployment and increase adoption of data security. The consortium has two better known specifications called TCG Enterprise and TCG Opal.

Sorting through the alphabet soup of data security
“Our SED with TCG Opal provides FDE.” While this might look like a spoonful of alphabet soup, it is music to the ears of a corporate IT manager. Let me break it down for those who just hear fingernails on the chalkboard. A self-encrypting drive (SED) is one that embeds a hardware-based encryption engine in the storage device. One chief benefit is that the hardware engine performs the encryption, preserving full performance of the host CPU. An SED can be a hard disk drive (HDD) or a solid state drive (SSD). True, traditional software encryption can secure data going to the storage device, but it consumes precious host CPU bandwidth. The related term, full drive encryption (FDE), is used to describe any drive (HDD or SSD) that stores data in an encrypted form. This can be through either software-based (host CPU) or hardware-based (an SED) encryption.

Most people would assume that if their work laptop were lost or stolen, they would suffer only some lost productivity for a short time and about $1,500 in hardware costs. However, a study by Intel and the Ponemon Institute found that the cost of a lost laptop totaled nearly $50,000 when you account for lost IP, legal costs, customer notifications, lost business, harm to reputation, and damages associated with compromising confidential customer information. When the data stored on the laptop is encrypted, this cost is reduced by nearly $20,000. This difference certainly supports the need for better security for these mobile platforms.

When considering a security solution for this valuable data, you have to decide between a hardware-based SED and a host-based software solution. The primary problem with software solutions is they require the host CPU to do all of the encryption. This detracts from the CPU’s core computing work, leaving users with a slower computer or forcing them to pay for greater CPU performance. Another drawback of many software encryption solutions is that they can be turned off by the computer user, leaving data in the clear and vulnerable. Since hardware-based encryption is native to the HDD or SSD, it cannot be disabled by the end user.

In April 2013, LSI and a few other storage companies worked with the Ponemon Institute to better understand the value of hardware-based encryption. You can read about the details in the study here, but the quick summary is that hardware-based encryption solutions can offer a 75% total cost savings over software-based solutions, on average.

When is this available?
At the Computex Taipei 2013 show earlier this month, LSI announced availability of a firmware update for SandForce® controllers that adds support for TCG Opal. The LSI suite at the show featured TCG Opal demonstrations using self-encrypting SSDs provided by SandForce Driven™ member companies, including Kingston, A-DATA, Avant and Edge. (Contact SSD manufacturers directly for product availability.)

 

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Imagine a bathtub full of water and asking someone to empty the tub while you turn your back for a moment. When you look again and see the water is gone, do you just assume someone pulled the drain plug?

I think most people would, but what about the other methods of removing the water like with a siphon, or using buckets to bail out the water? In a typical bathroom you are not likely to see these other methods used, but that does not mean they do not exist. The point is that just because you see a certain result does not necessarily mean the obvious solution was used.

I see a lot of confusion in forum posts from SandForce Driven™ SSD users and reviewers over how the LSI® DuraWrite™ data reduction and advanced garbage collection technology relates to the SATA TRIM command. In my earlier blog on TRIM I covered this topic in great detail, but in simple terms the operating system uses the TRIM command to inform an SSD what information is outdated and invalid. Without the TRIM command the SSD assumes all of the user capacity is valid data. I explained in my blog Gassing up your SSD that creating more free space through over provisioning or using less of the total capacity enables the SSD to operate more efficiently by reducing the write amplification, which leads to increased performance and flash memory endurance. So without TRIM the SSD operates at its lowest level of efficiency for a particular level of over provisioning.

Will you drown in invalid data without TRIM?
TRIM is a way to increase the free space on an SSD – what we call “dynamic over provisioning” – and DuraWrite technology is another method to increase the free space. Since DuraWrite technology is dependent upon the entropy (randomness) of the data, some users will get more free space than others depending on what data they store. Since the technology works on the basis of the aggregate of all data stored, boot SSDs with operating systems can still achieve some level of dynamic over provisioning even when all other files are at the highest entropy, e.g., encrypted or compressed files.

With an older operating system or in an environment that does not support TRIM (most RAID configurations), DuraWrite technology can provide enough free space to offer the same benefits as having TRIM fully operational. In cases where both TRIM and DuraWrite technology are operating, the combined result may not be as noticeable as when they’re working independently since there are diminishing returns when the free space grows to greater than half of the SSD storage capacity.

So the next time you fill your bathtub, think about all the ways you can get the water out of the tub without using the drain. That will help you remember that both TRIM and DuraWrite technology can improve SSD performance using different approaches to the same problem. If that analogy does not work for you, consider the different ways to produce a furless feline, and think about what opening graphic image I might have used for a more jolting effect. Although in that case you might not have seen this blog since that image would likely have gotten us banned from Google® “safe for work” searches.

I presented on this topic in detail at the Flash Memory Summit in 2011. You can read it in full here: http://www.lsi.com/downloads/Public/Flash%20Storage%20Processors/LSI_PRS_FMS2011_T1A_Smith.pdf

 

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It may sound crazy, but hard disk drives (HDDs) do not have a delete command. Now we all know HDDs have a fixed capacity, so over time the older data must somehow get removed, right? Actually it is not removed, but overwritten. The operating system (OS) uses a reference table to track the locations (addresses) of all data on the HDD. This table tells the OS which spots on the HDD are used and which are free. When the OS or a user deletes a file from the system, the OS simply marks the corresponding spot in the table as free, making it available to store new data.

The HDD is told nothing about this change, and it does not need to know since it would not do anything with that information. When the OS is ready to store new data in that location, it just sends the data to the HDD and tells it to write to that spot, directly overwriting the prior data. It is simple and efficient, and no delete command is required.

Enter SSDs
However, with the advent of NAND flash-based solid state drives (SSDs) a new problem emerged. In my blog, Gassing up your SSD, I explain how NAND flash memory pages cannot be directly overwritten with new data, but must first be erased at the block level through a process called garbage collection (GC). I further describe how the SSD uses non-user space in the flash memory (over provisioning or OP) to improve performance and longevity of the SSD. In addition, any user space not consumed by the user becomes what we call dynamic over provisioning – dynamic because it changes as the amount of stored data changes.

When less data is stored by the user, the amount of dynamic OP increases, further improving performance and endurance. The problem I alluded to earlier is caused by the lack of a delete command. Without a delete command, every SSD will eventually fill up with data, both valid and invalid, eliminating any dynamic OP. The result would be the lowest possible performance at that factory OP level. So unlike HDDs, SSDs need to know what data is invalid in order to provide optimum performance and endurance.

Keeping your SSD TRIM
A number of years ago, the storage industry got together and developed a solution between the OS and the SSD by creating a new SATA command called TRIM. It is not a command that forces the SSD to immediately erase data like some people believe. Actually the TRIM command can be thought of as a message from the OS about what previously used addresses on the SSD are no longer holding valid data. The SSD takes those addresses and updates its own internal map of its flash memory to mark those locations as invalid. With this information, the SSD no longer moves that invalid data during the GC process, eliminating wasted time rewriting invalid data to new flash pages. It also reduces the number of write cycles on the flash, increasing the SSD’s endurance. Another benefit of the TRIM command is that more space is available for dynamic OP.

Today, most current operating systems and SSDs support TRIM, and all SandForce Driven™ member SSDs have always supported TRIM. Note that most RAID environments do not support TRIM, although some RAID 0 configurations have claimed to support it. I have presented on this topic in detail previously. You can view the presentation in full here. In my next blog I will explain how there may be an alternate solution using SandForce Driven member SSDs.

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The term global warming can be very polarizing in a conversation and both sides of the argument have mountains of material that support or discredit the overall situation. The most devout believers in global warming point to the average temperature increases in the Earth’s atmosphere over the last 100+ years. They maintain the rise is primarily caused by increased greenhouse gases from humans burning fossil fuels and deforestation.

The opposition generally agrees with the measured increase in temperature over that time, but claims that increase is part of a natural cycle of the planet and not something humans can significantly impact one way or another. The US Energy Information Administration estimates that 90% of world’s marketed energy consumption is from non-renewable energy sources like fossil fuels. Our internet-driven lives run through datacenters that are well-known to consume large quantities of power. No matter which side of the global warming argument you support, most people agree that wasting power is not a good long-term position. Therefore, if the power consumed by datacenters can be reduced, especially as we live in an increasingly digitized world, this would benefit all mankind.

When we look at the most power-hungry components of a datacenter, we find mainly server and storage systems. However, people sometimes forget that those systems require cooling to counteract the heat generated. But the cooling itself consumes even more energy. So anything that can store data more efficiently and quickly will reduce both the initial energy consumption and the energy to cool those systems. As datacenters demand faster data storage, they are shifting to solid state drives (SSDs). SSDs generally provide higher performance per watt of power consumed over hard disk drives, but there is still more that can be done.

Reducing data to help turn down the heat
The good news is that there’s a way to reduce the amount of data that reaches the flash memory of the SSD. The unique DuraWrite™ technology found in all LSI® SandForce® flash controllers reduces the amount of data written to the flash memory to cut the time it takes to complete the writes and therefore reduce power consumption, below levels of other SSD technologies. That, in turn, reduces the cooling needed to further reduce overall power consumption. Now this data reduction is “loss-less,” meaning 100% of what is saved is returned to the host, unlike MPEG, JPEG, and MP3 files, which tolerate some amount of data loss to reduce file sizes.

Today you can find many datacenters already using SandForce Driven SSDs and LSI Nytro™ application acceleration products (which use DuraWrite technology as well). When we start to see datacenters deploying these flash storage products by the millions, you will certainly be able to measure the reduction in power consumed by datacenters. Unfortunately, LSI will not be able to claim it stopped global warming, but at least we, and our customers, can say we did something to help defer the end result.

 

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Have you ever run out of gas in your car? Do you often risk running your gas tank dry? Hopefully you are more cautious than that and you start searching for a gas station when you get down to a ¼ tank. You do this because you want plenty of cushion in case something comes up that prevents you from getting to a station before it is too late.

The reason most people stretch their tank is to maximize travel between station visits. The downside to pushing the envelope to “E” is you can end up stranded with a dead vehicle waiting for AAA to bring you some gas.

Now most people know you don’t put gas in a solid state drive (SSD), but the pros and cons associated with how much you leave in the “tank” is very relevant to SSDs.

To understand how these two seemingly unrelated technologies are similar, we first need to drill into some technical SSD details. To start, SSDs act, and often look, like traditional hard disk drives (HDDs), but they do not record data in the same way. SSDs today typically use NAND flash memory to store data and a flash controller to connect the memory with the host computer. The flash controller can write a page of data (often 4,096 bytes) directly to the flash memory, but cannot overwrite the same page of data without first erasing it. The erase cycle cannot expunge only a single page. Instead, it erases a whole block of data (usually 128 pages). Because the stored data is sometimes updated randomly across the flash, the erase cycle for NAND flash requires a process called garbage collection.

Garbage collection is just dumping the trash
Garbage collection starts when a flash block is full of data, usually a mix of valid (good) and invalid (older, replaced) data. The invalid data must be tossed out to make room for new data, so the flash controller copies the valid data of a flash block to a previously erased block, and skips copying the invalid data of that block. The final step is to erase the original whole block, preparing it for new data to be written.

Before and during garbage collection, some data – valid data copied during garbage collection and the (typically) multiple copies of the invalid data – is in two or more locations at once, a phenomenon known as write amplification. To store this extra data not counted by the operating system, the flash controller needs some spare capacity beyond what the operating system knows. This is called over-provisioning (OP), and it is a critical part of every NAND flash-based SSD.

Over-provisioning is like the gas that remains in your tank
While every SSD has some amount of OP, some will have more or less than others. The amount of OP varies depending on trade-offs made between total storage capacity and benefits in performance and endurance. The less OP allocated in an SSD, the more information a user can store. This is like the driver who will take their tank of gas clear down to near-empty just to maximize the total number of miles between station visits.

What many SSD users don’t realize is there are major benefits to NOT stretching this OP area too thin. When you allocate more space for OP, you achieve a lower write amplification, which translates to a higher performance during writes and longer endurance of the flash memory. This is like the driver who is more cautious and visits the gas station more often to enable greater flexibility in selecting a more cost-effective station, and allows for last-minute deviations in travel plans that end up burning more fuel than originally anticipated.

The choice is yours
Most SSD users do not realize they have full control of how much OP is configured in their SSD. So even if you buy an SSD with “0%” OP, you can dedicate some of the user space back to OP for the SSD.

A more detailed presentation of how OP works and what 0% OP really means was presented at the Flash Memory Summit 2012 and can be viewed with this link for your convenience: http://www.lsi.com/downloads/Public/Flash%20Storage%20Processors/LSI_PRS_FMS2012_TE21_Smith.pdf

It pays to be the cautious driver who fills the gas tank long before you get to empty. When it comes to both performance and endurance, your SSD will cover a lot more ground if you treat the over-provisioning space the same way – keeping more in reserve.

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