Big data, it’s the buzz word of the year and it’s generating a lot of attention. An incalculable number of articles fervently repeat the words “variety, velocity and volume,” citing click streams, RFID tags, email, surveillance cameras, Twitter® feeds, Facebook® posts, Flickr® images, blog musings, YouTube® videos, cellular texting, healthcare monitoring …. (gasps for air). We have become a society that sweats buckets of data every day (the latest estimates are approximately 34GB per person every 24 hours) and businesses are scrambling to capture all this information to learn more about us.

Save every scrap of data!
“Save all your data” has become the new business mantra, because data – no matter how seemingly meaningless it appears – contains information, and information provides insight, and improved insight makes for better decision-making, and better decision-making leads to a more efficient and profitable business.

Okay, so we get why we save data, but if the electronic bit bucket costs become prohibitive, big data could turn into its own worst enemy, undermining the value of mining data.  While Hadoop® software is an excellent (and cost-free) tool for storing and analyzing data, most organizations use a multitude of applications in conjunction with Hadoop to create a system for data ingest, analytics, data cleansing and record management. Several Hadoop vendors (Cloudera, MapR, Hortonworks, Intel, IBM, Pivotal) offer bundled software packages that ease integration and installation of these applications.

Installing a Hadoop cluster to manage big data can be a chore
With the demand for data scientists growing, the challenge can become finding the right talent to help build and manage a big data infrastructure.  A case in point: Installing a Hadoop cluster involves more than just installing the Hadoop software. Here is the sequence of steps:

  1. Install the hardware, disks, cables.
  2. Install the operating system.
  3. Optimize the file system and operating system (OS) parameters (i.e. open file limits, virtual memory).
  4. Configure and optimize the network and switches.
  5. Plan node management (for Hadoop 1.x this would be Namenode, Secondary Namenode, JobTracker, ZooKeeper, etc.).
  6. Install Hadoop across all the nodes. Configure each node according to its planned role.
  7. Configure high availability (HA) (when required).
  8. Configure security (i.e. Kerberos, Secure Shell [ssh]).
  9. Apply optimizations (I have several years’ experience in Hadoop optimization, so can say with some authority that this is not a job to be taken lightly. The benefits of a well-optimized cluster are incredible, but it can be a challenge to balance the resources correctly without adding undo system pressure elsewhere.)
  10. Install and integrate additional software and connectors (i.e. to connect to data warehousing system, input streams or database management system [DBMS] servers).
  11. Test the system.

Setup, from bare bones to a simple 15-node cluster, can take weeks to months including planning, research, installation and integration. It’s no small job.

Appliances simplify Hadoop cluster deployments
Enter appliances: low-cost, pre-validated, easy-to-deploy “bricks.” According to a Gartner forecast (Forecast: Data Center Hardware Spending to Support Big Data Projects, Worldwide 2013), appliance spending for big data projects will grow from 0.9% of hardware spending in 2012 to 9.3% by 2017. I have found myself inside a swirl of new big data appliance projects all designed to provide highly integrated systems with easy support and fully tested integration. An appliance is a great turnkey solution for companies that can’t (or don’t wish to) employ a hardware and software installation team: Simply pick up the box from the shipping area, unpack it and start analyzing data within minutes. In addition, many companies are just beginning to dabble in Hadoop, and appliances can be an easy, cost-effective way to demonstrate the value of Hadoop before making a larger investment.

While Hadoop is commonplace in the big data infrastructure, the use models can be quite varied. I’ve heard my fair share of highly connected big data engineers attempt to identify core categories for Hadoop deployments, and they generally fall into one of four categories:

  1. Business intelligence, querying, reporting, searching – such as filtering, indexing, trend analysis, search optimization – and good old-fashioned information retrieval.
  2. Higher performance for common data management operations including log storage, data storage and archiving, extraction/transform loading (ETL) processing and data conversions.
  3. Non database applications such as image processing, data sequencing, web crawling and workflow processing.
  4. Data mining and analytical applications including social network/sentiment analysis, profile matching, machine learning, personalization and recommendation analysis, ad optimization and behavioral analysis.

Finding the right appliance for you
While appliances lower the barrier to entry to Hadoop clusters, their designs and costs are as varied as their use cases.  Some appliances build in the flexibility of cloud services, while others focus on integration of applications components and reducing service level agreements (SLAs). Still others focus primarily on low cost storage. And while some appliances are just hardware (although they are validated designs), they still require a separate software agreement and installation via a third-party vendor.

In general, pricing is usually quoted either by capacity ($/TB), or per node or rack depending on the vendor and product. Licensing can significantly increase overall costs, with annual maintenance costs (software subscription and support) and license renewals adding to the cost of doing business. The good news is that, with so many appliances to choose from, any organization can find one that enables it to design a cluster that fits its budget, operating costs and value expectations.

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Walking the Great Wall before visits to some of China’s hyperscale datacenters

I’ve been travelling to China quite a bit over the last year or so. I’m sitting in Shenzhen right now (If you know Chinese internet companies, you’ll know who I’m visiting). The growth is staggering. I’ve had a bit of a trains, planes, automobiles experience this trip, and that’s exposed me to parts of China I never would have seen otherwise. Just to accommodate sheer population growth and the modest increase in wealth, there is construction everywhere – a press of people and energy, constant traffic jams, unending urban centers, and most everything is new. Very new. It must be exciting to be part of that explosive growth. What a market.  I mean – come on – there are 1.3 billion potential users in China.

The amazing thing for me is the rapid growth of hyperscale datacenters in China, which is truly exponential. Their infrastructure growth has been 200%-300% CAGR for the past few years. It’s also fantastic walking into a building in China, say Baidu, and feeling very much at home – just like you walked into Facebook or Google. It’s the same young vibe, energy, and ambition to change how the world does things. And it’s also the same pleasure – talking to architects who are super-sharp, have few technical prejudices, and have very little vanity – just a will to get to business and solve problems. Polite, but blunt. We’re lucky that they recognize LSI as a leader, and are willing to spend time to listen to our ideas, and to give us theirs.

Even their infrastructure has a similar feel to the US hyperscale datacenters. The same only different.  ;-)

Alibaba (top and bottom) and Baidu visitor badges

Profitability
A lot of these guys are growing revenue at 50% per year, several getting 50% gross margin. Those are nice numbers in any country. One has $100’s of billions in revenue.  And they’re starting to push out of China.  So far their pushes into Japan have not gone well, but other countries should be better. They all have unique business models. “We” in the US like to say things like “Alibaba is the Chinese eBay” or “Sina Weibo is the Chinese Twitter”…. But that’s not true – they all have more hybrid business models, unique, and so their datacenter goals, revenue and growth have a slightly different profile. And there are some very cool services that simply are not available elsewhere. (You listening Apple®, Google®, Twitter®, Facebook®?) But they are all expanding their services, products and user base. Interestingly, there is very little public cloud in China. So there are no real equivalents to Amazon’s services or Microsoft’s Azure. I have heard about current development of that kind of model with the government as initial customer. We’ll see how that goes.

Scale
100’s of thousands of servers. They’re not the scale of Google, but they sure are the scale of Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft…. It’s a serious market for an outfit like LSI. Really it’s a very similar scale now to the US market. Close to 1 million servers installed among the main 4 players, and exabytes of data (we’ve blown past mere petabytes). Interestingly, they still use many co-location facilities, but that will change. More important – they’re all planning to probably double their infrastructure in the next 1-2 years – they have to – their growth rates are crazy.

Platforms
Often 5 or 6 distinct platforms, just like the US hyperscale datacenters. Database platforms, storage platforms, analytics platforms, archival platforms, web server platforms…. But they tend to be a little more like a rack of traditional servers that enterprise buys with integrated disk bays, still a lot of 1G Ethernet, and they are still mostly from established OEMs. In fact I just ran into one OEM’s American GM, who I happen to know, in Tencent’s offices today. The typical servers have 12 HDDs in drive bays, though they are starting to look at SSDs as part of the storage platform. They do use PCIe® flash cards in some platforms, but the performance requirements are not as extreme as you might imagine. Reasonably low latency and consistent latency are the premium they are looking for from these flash cards – not maximum IOPs or bandwidth – very similar to their American counterparts. I think hyperscale datacenters are sophisticated in understanding what they need from flash, and not requiring more than that. Enterprise could learn a thing or two.

Some server platforms have RAIDed HDDs, but most are direct map drives using a high availability (HA) layer across the server center – Hadoop® HDFS or self-developed Hadoop like platforms. Some have also started to deploy microserver archival “bit buckets.” A small ARM® SoC with 4 HDDs totaling 12 TBytes of storage, giving densities like 72 TBytes of file storage in 2U of rack. While I can only find about 5,000 of those in China that are the first generation experiments, it’s the first of a growing wave of archival solutions based on lower performance ARM servers. The feedback is clear – they’re not perfect yet, but the writing is on the wall. (If you’re wondering about the math, that’s 5,000 x 12 TBytes = 60 Petabytes….)

Power
Yes, it’s important, but maybe more than we’re used to. It’s harder to get licenses for power in China. So it’s really important to stay within the envelope of power your datacenter has. You simply can’t get more. That means they have to deploy solutions that do more in the same power profile, especially as they move out of co-located datacenters into private ones. Annually, 50% more users supported, more storage capacity, more performance, more services, all in the same power. That’s not so easy. I would expect solar power in their future, just as Apple has done.

Scorpio
Here’s where it gets interesting. They are developing a cousin to OpenCompute that’s called Scorpio. It’s Tencent, Alibaba, Baidu, and China Telecom so far driving the standard.  The goals are similar to OpenCompute, but more aligned to standardized sub-systems that can be co-mingled from multiple vendors. There is some harmonization and coordination between OpenCompute and Scorpio, and in fact the Scorpio companies are members of OpenCompute. But where OpenCompute is trying to change the complete architecture of scale-out clusters, Scorpio is much more pragmatic – some would say less ambitious. They’ve finished version 1 and rolled out about 200 racks as a “test case” to learn from. Baidu was the guinea pig. That’s around 6,000 servers. They weren’t expecting more from version 1. They’re trying to learn. They’ve made mistakes, learned a lot, and are working on version 2.

Even if it’s not exciting, it will have an impact because of the sheer size of deployments these guys are getting ready to roll out in the next few years. They see the progression as 1) they were using standard equipment, 2) they’re experimenting and learning from trial runs of Scorpio versions 1 and 2, and then they’ll work on 3) new architectures that are efficient and powerful, and different.

Information is pretty sketchy if you are not one of the member companies or one of their direct vendors. We were just invited to join Scorpio by one of the founders, and would be the first group outside of China to do so. If that all works out, I’ll have a much better idea of the details, and hopefully can influence the standards to be better for these hyperscale datacenter applications. Between OpenCompute and Scorpio we’ll be seeing a major shift in the industry – a shift that will undoubtedly be disturbing to a lot of current players. It makes me nervous, even though I’m excited about it. One thing is sure – just as the server market volume is migrating from traditional enterprise to hyperscale datacenter (25-30% of the server market and growing quickly), we’re starting to see a migration to Chinese hyperscale datacenters from US-based ones. They have to grow just to stay still. I mean – come on – there are 1.3 billion potential users in China….

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