How did he do that?
Growing up, I watched a little TV.  Okay, a lot of TV as I did not have my DVR or iPad and a man who would one day occupy the White House as VP had not yet invented the Internet.  Of the many shows I watched, MacGyver was one of my favorites. He would take ordinary objects and use them to solve complicated problems in a way no one could have imagined. Out of all the things he used, his trusty Swiss army knife was the most awesome.  With all its blades, tools and accessories, it could solve multiple problems at the same time.  It was easy to use, did not take up a lot of space and was very cost-effective.

Nytro MegaRAID – the Swiss Army knife of server storage
LSI has its own multi-function, get-yourself-out-of-a-fix workhorse – the Nytro MegaRAID® card, part of the Nytro product family. It combines caching intelligence, RAID protection and flash on a single PCIe® card to accelerate applications, so it can be deployed to solve problems across a broad number of applications.

A feature for every challenge!
The Nytro MegaRAID card is built on the same trusted technology as the MegaRAID cards deployed in datacenters worldwide. That means, it is enterprise architected and hardened and datacenter tested.  Its Swiss Army knife-like features include, as I mentioned, on-board flash storage that can be configured to monitor the flow of data from an application to the attached RAID protected storage, intelligently identify hot, or the most frequently accessed, data, and automatically move a copy of that data to the flash storage to accelerate applications.   The next time the application needs that data, the information is fetched from flash, not the much slower traditional hard disk drive (HDD) storage.

Hard drives can lead to slowdowns in another way, too, when the mechanics wear out and fail. When they do, your storage (and application) performance can dramatically decrease – in a RAID storage environment, this is called degraded mode. The good news is that the Nytro MegaRAID card stores much of an application’s frequently used data in its intelligent flash based cache, boosting the performance of a connected HDD in degrade mode by as much as 10x, depending on the configuration.  The Swiss Army knife follow-on benefit is that when you replace the failed drive, Nytro MegaRAID speeds RAID storage rebuilds by as much as 4x.  RAID rebuilds add to IT admin time, and IT time is money, so that’s money you get to keep in your pocket.

The Nytro MegaRAID card also can be configured so you can use half of its onboard flash as a pair of mirrored boot drives.  In big data environments, this mirroring frees up two boot drives for use as data storage to help increase your server storage density (aka available storage capacity), often significantly, while dramatically improving boot time.  What’s more, that same flash can be deployed instead as primary storage to complement your secondary HDD storage with higher speeds, providing a superfast repository for key files like virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) golden images or key database log files.

One MacGyver Swiss Army knife, one Nytro MegaRAID card – both easy-to-use solutions for a number of complex problems.

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LSI’s Accelerating Innovation Summit in San Jose has given me a sneak peak of some solutions our partners are putting together to solve datacenter challenges. Such is the case with EMC’s ScaleIO business unit (EMC recently acquired ScaleIO), which has rolled out some nifty software that helps streamline VDI (Virtual Desktop Infrastructure) scaling.

As I shared in a previous blog, VDI deployments are growing like gangbusters. It’s easy to see why. The manageability and security benefits of virtualized desktop environment are tough to beat.  Deploying and supporting hundreds of desktops as VDI instances on a single server lets you centralize desktop management and security.  Another advantage is that patches, security updates, and hardware and software upgrades demand much less overhead. VDI also dramatically reduces the risk that desktop users will breach security by making it easier to prevent data from being copied onto portable media or sent externally.

Mass boots drag down VDI performance
But as with all new technologies, a number of performance challenges can crop up when you move to a virtual world.  In enterprise-scale deployments, VDI performance can suffer when the IT administrator attempts to boot all those desktops Monday morning or reboot after Patch Tuesday.  What’s more, VDI performance can drop significantly when users all log in in at the same time each morning. In addition, virtualized environments sometimes are unfriendly to slews of users trying to access files simultaneously, making them wait because of the heavy traffic load. One bottleneck often is legacy SAN-connected storage since file access requests are queued through a single storage controller.  And of course increasing the density of virtual desktops supported by a server can exacerbate the whole performance problem.

VDI’s are ripe for distributed storage, and the ScaleIO ECS (Elastic Converged Storage) software is a compelling solution, incorporating an elastic storage infrastructure that scales both capacity and performance with changing business requirements. The software pools local direct attached storage (DAS) on each server into a large storage repository. If desktops are moved between physical servers, or if a server fails, the datacenter’s existing high-speed network moves data to the local storage of the new server.

LSI Nytro and ScaleIO ECS software boost VDI session number, reduce costs
In an AIS demonstration, the ScaleIO ECS software leverages the application acceleration of the LSI® Nytro™ MegaRAID® card to significantly increase the number of VDI sessions the VDI server could support, reducing the cost of each VDI session by up to 33%. Better yet, application acceleration gives users shorter response times than they see on their laptops. By using the ScaleIO ECS software and Nytro MegaRAID card, customers get the benefits high-availability storage and intelligent flash acceleration at a more budget-friendly price point than comparable SAN-based solutions.

 

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Back in the 1990s, a new paradigm was forced into space exploration. NASA faced big cost cuts. But grand ambitions for missions to Mars were still on its mind. The problem was it couldn’t dream and spend big. So the NASA mantra became “faster, better, cheaper.” The idea was that the agency could slash costs while still carrying out a wide variety of programs and space missions. This led to some radical rethinks, and some fantastically successful programs that had very outside-the-box solutions. (Bouncing Mars landers anyone?)

That probably sounds familiar to any IT admin. And that spirit is alive at LSI’s AIS – The Accelerating Innovation Summit, which is our annual congress of customers and industry pros, coming up Nov. 20-21 in San Jose. Like the people at Mission Control, they all want to make big things happen… without spending too much.

Take technology and line of business professionals. They need to speed up critical business applications. A lot. Or IT staff for enterprise and mobile networks, who must deliver more work to support the ever-growing number of users, devices and virtualized machines that depend on them. Or consider mega datacenter and cloud service providers, whose customers demand the highest levels of service, yet get that service for free. Or datacenter architects and managers, who need servers, storage and networks to run at ever-greater efficiency even as they grow capability exponentially.

(LSI has been working on many solutions to these problems, some of which I spoke about in this blog.)

It’s all about moving data faster, better, and cheaper. If NASA could do it, we can too. In that vein, here’s a look at some of the topics you can expect AIS to address around doing more work for fewer dollars:

  • Emerging solid state technologies – Flash is dramatically enhancing datacenter efficiency and enabling new use cases. Could emerging solid state technologies such as Phase Change Memory (PCM) and Spin-Torque Transfer (STT) RAM radically change the way we use storage and memory?
  • Hyperscale deployments – Traditional SAN and NAS lack the scalability and economics needed for today’s hyperscale deployments. As businesses begin to emulate hyperscale deployments, they need to scale and manage datacenter infrastructure more effectively. Will software increasingly be used to both manage storage and provide storage services on commodity hardware?
  • Sub-20nm flash – The emergence of sub-20nm flash promises new cost savings for the storage industry. But with reduced data reliability, slower overall access times and much lower intrinsic endurance, is it ready for the datacenter?
  • Triple-Level Cell flash – The move to Multi-Level Cell (MLC) flash helped double the capacity per square millimeter of silicon, and Triple-Level Cell (TLC) promises even higher storage density. But TCL comes at a cost: its working life is much shorter than MLC. So what, if any role will TLC play in the datacenter? Remember – it wasn’t long ago no one believed MLC could be used in enterprise.
  • Flash for virtual desktop – Virtual desktop technology has seen significant growth in today’s datacenters. However, storage demands on highly utilized VDI servers can cause unacceptable response times. Can flash help virtual desktop environments achieve the best overall performance to improve end-user productivity while lowering total solution cost?
  • Flash caching – Oracle and storage vendors have started enhancing their products to take advantage of flash caching. How can database administrators implement caching technology running on Oracle® Linux with Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel, utilizing Oracle Database Smart Flash Cache?
  • Software Defined Networks (SDN) – SDNs promise to make networks more flexible, easier to manage, and programmable. How and why are businesses using SDNs today?  
  • Big data analytics – Gathering, interpreting and correlating multiple data streams as they are created can enhance real-time decision making for industries like financial trading, national security, consumer marketing, and network security. How can specialized silicon greatly reduce the compute power necessary, and make the “real-time” part of real-time analytics possible?
  • Sharable DAS – Datacenters of all sizes are struggling to provide high performance and 24/7 uptime, while reducing TCO. How can DAS-based storage sharing and scaling help meet the growing need for reduced cost and greater ease of use, performance, agility and uptime?
  • 12Gb/s SAS – Applications such as Web 2.0/cloud infrastructure, transaction processing and business intelligence are driving the need for higher-performance storage. How can 12Gb/s SAS meet today’s high-performance challenges for IOPS and bandwidth while providing enterprise-class features, technology maturity and investment protection, even with existing storage devices?

And, I think you’ll find some astounding products, demos, proof of concepts and future solutions in the showcase too – not just from LSI but from partners and fellow travelers in this industry. Hey – that’s my favorite part. I can’t wait to see people’s reactions.

Since they rethought how to do business in 2002, NASA has embarked on nearly 60 Mars missions. Faster, better, cheaper. It can work here in IT too.

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Optimizing the work per dollar spent is a high priority in datacenters around the world. But there aren’t many ways to accomplish that. I’d argue that integrating flash into the storage system drives the best – sometimes most profound – improvement in the cost of getting work done.

Yea, I know work/$ is a US-centric metric, but replace the $ with your favorite currency. The principle remains the same.

I had the chance to talk with one of the execs who’s responsible for Google’s infrastructure last week. He talked about how his fundamental job was improving performance/$. I asked about that, and he explained “performance” as how much work an application could get done. I asked if work/$ at the application was the same, and he agreed – yes – pretty much.

You remember as a kid that you brought along a big brother as authoritative backup? OK – so my big brother Google and I agree – you should be trying to optimize your work/$. Why? Well – it could be to spend less, or to do more with the same spend, or do things you could never do before, or simply to cope with the non-linear expansion in IT demands even as budgets are shrinking. Hey – that’s the definition of improving work/$… (And as a bonus, if you do it right, you’ll have a positive green impact that is bound to be worth brownie points.)

Here’s the point. Processors are no longer scaling the same – sure, there are more threads, but not all applications can use all those threads. Systems are becoming harder to balance for efficiency. And often storage is the bottleneck. Especially for any application built on a database. So sure – you can get 5% or 10% gain, or even in the extreme 100% gain in application work done by a server if you’re willing to pay enough and upgrade all aspects of the server: processors, memory, network… But it’s almost impossible to increase the work of a server or application by 200%, 300% or 400% – for any money.

I’m going to explain how and why you can do that, and what you get back in work/$. So much back that you’ll probably be spending less and getting more done. And I’m going to explain how even for the risk-averse, you can avoid risk and get the improvements.

More work/$ from general-purpose DAS servers and large databases
Let me start with a customer. It’s a bank, and it likes databases. A lot. And it likes large databases even more. So much so that it needs disks to hold the entire database. Using an early version of an LSI Nytro™ MegaRAID® card, it got 6x the work from the same individual node and database license. You can read that as 600% if you want. It’s big. To be fair – that early version had much more flash than our current products, and was much more expensive. Our current products give much closer to 3x-4x improvement. Again, you can think of that as 300%-400%. Again, slap a Nytro MegaRAID into your server and it’s going to do the work of 3 to 4 servers. I just did a web search and, depending on configuration, Nytro MegaRAIDs are $1,800 to $2,800 online. I don’t know about you, but I would have a hard time buying 2 to 3 configured servers + software licenses for that little, but that’s the net effect of this solution. It’s not about faster (although you get that). It’s about getting more work/$.

But you also want to feel safe – that you’re absolutely minimizing risk. OK. Nytro MegaRAID is a MegaRAID card. That’s overwhelmingly the most common RAID controller in the world, and it’s used by 9 of the top 10 OEMs, and protects 10’s to 100‘s of millions of disks every day. The Nytro version adds private flash caching in the card and stores hot reads and writes there. Writes to the cache use a RAID 1 pair. So if a flash module dies, you’re protected. If the flash blocks or chip die wear out, the bad blocks are removed from the cache pool, and the cache shrinks by that much, but everything keeps operating – it’s not like a normal LUN that can’t change size. What’s more, flash blocks usually finally wear out during the erase cycle – so no data is lost.  And as a bonus, you can eliminate the traditional battery most RAID cards use – the embedded flash covers that – so no more annual battery service needed. This is a solution that will continue to improve work/$ for years and years, all the while getting 3x-4x the work from that server.

More work/$ from SAN-attached servers (without actually touching the SAN)
That example was great – but you don’t use DAS systems. Instead, you use a big iron SAN. (OK, not all SANs are big iron, but I like the sound of that expression.) There are a few ways to improve the work from servers attached to SANs. The easiest of course is to upgrade the SAN head, usually with a flash-based cache in the SAN controller. This works, and sometimes is “good enough” to cover needs for a year or two. However, the server still needs to reach across the SAN to access data, and it’s still forced to interact with other servers’ IO streams in deeper queues. That puts a hard limit on the possible gains. 

Nytro XD caches hot data in the server. It works with virtual machines. It intercepts storage traffic at the block layer – the same place LSI’s drivers have always been. If the data isn’t hot, and isn’t cached, it simply passes the traffic through to the SAN. I say this so you understand – it doesn’t actually touch the SAN. No risk there. More importantly, the hot storage traffic never has to be squeezed through the SAN fabric, and it doesn’t get queued in the SAN head. In other words, it makes the storage really, really fast.

We’ve typically found work from a server can increase 5x to 10x, and that’s been verified by independent reviewers. What’s more, the Nytro XD solution only costs around 4x the price of a high-end SAN NIC. It’s not cheap, but it’s way cheaper than upgrading your SAN arrays, it’s way cheaper than buying more servers, and it’s proven to enable you to get far more work from your existing infrastructure. When you need to get more work – way more work – from your SAN, this is a really cost-effective approach. Seriously – how else would you get 5x-10x more work from your existing servers and software licenses?

More work/$ from databases
A lot of hyperscale datacenters are built around databases of a finite size. That may be 1, 2 or even 4 TBytes. If you use Apple’s online services for iTunes or iCloud, or if you use Facebook, you’re using this kind of infrastructure.

If your datacenter has a database that can fit within a few TBytes (or less), you can use the same approach. Move the entire LUN into a Nytro WarpDrive® card, and you will get 10x the work from your server and database software. It makes such a difference that some architects argue Facebook and Apple cloud services would never have been possible without this type of solution. I don’t know, but they’re probably right. You can buy a Nytro WarpDrive for as little as a low-end server. I mean low end. But it will give you the work of 10. If you have a fixed-size database, you owe it to yourself to look into this one.

More work/$ from virtualized and VDI (Virtual Desktop) systems
Virtual machines are installed on a lot of servers, for very good reason. They help improve the work/$ in the datacenter by reducing the number of servers needed and thereby reducing management, maintenance and power costs. But what if they could be made even more efficient?

Wall Street banks have benchmarked virtual desktops. They found that Nytro products drive these results: support of 2x the virtual desktops, 33% improvement in boot time during boot storms, and 33% lower cost per virtual desktop. In a more general application mix, Nytro increases work per server 2x-4x.  And it also gives 2x performance for virtual storage appliances.

While that’s not as great as 10x the work, it’s still a real work/$ value that’s hard to ignore. And it’s the same reliable MegaRAID infrastructure that’s the backbone of enterprise DAS storage.

A real example from our own datacenter
Finally – a great example of getting far more work/$ was an experiment our CIO Bruce Decock did. We use a lot of servers to fuel our chip-design business. We tape out a lot of very big leading-edge process chips every year. Hundreds.  And that takes an unbelievable amount of processing to get what we call “design closure” – that is, a workable chip that will meet performance requirements and yield. We use a tool called PrimeTime that figures out timing for every signal on the chip across different silicon process points and operating conditions. There are 10’s to 100’s of millions of signals. And we run every active design – 10’s to 100’s of chips – each night so we can see how close we’re getting, and we make multiple runs per chip. That’s a lot of computation… The thing is, electronic CAD has been designed to try not to use storage or it will never finish – just /tmp space, but CAD does use huge amounts of memory for the data structures, and that means swap space on the order of TBytes. These CAD tools usually don’t need to run faster. They run overnight and results are ready when the engineers come in the next day. These are impressive machines: 384G or 768G of DRAM and 32 threads.  How do you improve work/$ in that situation? What did Bruce do?

He put LSI Nytro WarpDrives in the servers and pointed /tmp at the WarpDrives. Yep. Pretty complex. I don’t think he even had to install new drivers. The drivers are already in the latest OS distributions. Anyway – like I said – complex.

The result? WarpDrive allowed the machines to fully use the CPU and memory with no I/O contention. With WarpDrive, the PrimeTime jobs for static timing closure of a typical design could be done on 15 vs. 40 machines. That’s each Nytro node doing 260% of the work vs. a normal node and license. Remember – those are expensive machines (have you priced 768G of DRAM and do you know how much specialized electronic design CAD licenses are?) So the point wasn’t to execute faster. That’s not necessary. The point is to use fewer servers to do the work. In this case we could do 11 runs per server per night instead of just 4. A single chip design needs more than 150 runs in one night.

To be clear, the Nytro WarpDrives are a lot less expensive than the servers they displace. And the savings go beyond that – less power and cooling. Lower maintenance. Less admin time and overhead. Fewer Licenses.  That’s definitely improved work/$ for years to come. Those Nytro cards are part of our standard flow, and they should probably be part of every chip company’s design flow.

So you can improve work/$ no matter the application, no matter your storage model, and no matter how risk-averse you are.

Optimizing the work per dollar spent is a high – maybe the highest – priority in datacenters around the world. And just to be clear – Google agrees with me. There aren’t many ways to accomplish that improvement, and almost no ways to dramatically improve it. I’d argue that integrating flash into the storage system is the best – sometimes most profound – improvement in the cost of getting work done. Not so much the performance, but the actual work done for the money spent. And it ripples through the datacenter, from original CapEx, to licenses, maintenance, admin overhead, power and cooling, and floor space for years. That’s a pretty good deal. You should look into it.

For those of you who are interested, I already wrote about flash in these posts:
What are the driving forces behind going diskless?
LSI is green – no foolin’

 

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